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Why we’ve entered book into top design and production awards July 25, 2012

Posted by Jonathan Barnes, editor in Independent Education, John Catt Educational news.
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We think our production team have done a particularly excellent job with our recent release, Physical Education and Sport in Independent Schools, so we have entered it into the British Book Design and Production Awards 2012.

The book, examining the role of physical education teaching and sports provision in the independent sector, is edited by Malcolm Tozer with illustrations by Anna Tozer and features contributions from leading names in sport including Sir Clive Woodward, Jonathan Edwards, Baroness Grey-Thompson and Roger Black, with a foreword by HRH The Princess Royal.

We’ve entered the book into the Secondary Education section of the awards and the Best British Book category. Competition will be fierce in the awards, organised by the BPIF in association with Oxford Brookes University and The Publishers Association. The awards ceremony is at Grange St Paul’s Hotel in London in November.

We’ve already told you plenty about what’s in the book in previous posts – for example, this one here – but here’s a little about its design and production:

–  It uses Plantin, a transitional serif typeface named after the printer Christophe Plantin. It was first cut in 1913 and is one of the typefaces that influenced the creation of Times Roman in the 1930s – a truly British typeface.

– For layout, we used the ‘Golden Section/Ratio’. There was a time when layout rarely deviated from these page proportions: 2:3, 1:√3. Many books produced between 1550 and 1770 show these proportions exactly, to within half a millimetre.

– Throughout the text, the paper used is Munken Print Cream, which combines the best properties of woodfree and wood-containing paper. It provides bulk, strength, surface, readability and printability that has been optimised for book productions.

To order a copy of the book, visit our bookshop.

Q&A with editor Malcolm Tozer on new book examining role of physical education and sport in independent schools July 9, 2012

Posted by Jonathan Barnes, editor in Independent Education, New releases.
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We’re pleased to report brisk sales and excellent feedback to our new title, Physical Education and Sport in Independent Schools.

The book, edited by Malcolm Tozer, is essential reading for headteachers, directors of sport, PE teachers and sports coaches, especially as the UK prepares for the 2012 Olympic Games and prepares to build on its legacy.

The title features contributions from top sportspeople and leading educators. For a full list of contributors and chapter titles, see this earlier post.

We asked Malcolm, a former physical education teacher at Uppingham School and headmaster at Northamptonshire Grammar School and Wellow House School, some questions about his inspiration for the book and how he went about putting it together…

Have you always been closely involved with PE and sport throughout your career? Has sport been a lifelong passion?

I was fortunate to attend schools and universities where PE and sport were important; I always enjoyed participating in PE and sport; so it was natural for me to want to continue with both when I became a teacher. And yes, I was involved with both throughout my teaching career, even in the sixteen years when I was a headmaster.

What was your inspiration for putting the book together?

It was a happy day when I was asked to produce the book and to be given free rein to plot my own course. The starting point was Jonathan Edwards’s story, for I knew how much he owed to his PE teacher. This led to the other essays in the Lasting Benefits sections. I then went back to State of Play to record what was going on in schools – and why – and finally I went forward to raise the questions in Talking Points. Thanks to the ready responses from all the contributors, the end product did indeed closely match the original concept.

The book is divided into sections that look at the historical context, the current ‘state of play’, the ‘lasting benefits’ of a sporting education and various talking points. How important was it to present an holistic view of PE and sport?

Very important – not least because this was a chance in a generation to tell the whole story – for nothing like it had been published during my teaching career. PE and sport contribute hugely to an holistic education, so it was important to examine all aspects of their contribution – whether to health and fitness or through personal development.

Is there any precedent in literature on PE and sport in independent schools?

Brian Ashley, then at Marlborough College, contributed the findings of a survey on PE in boys’ independent schools, mainly boarding ones, to a Schools Council enquiry on PE in secondary schools in 1974. I know of nothing else – which explains why as I was keen to grab the opportunity.

Some leading names in sport – Jonathan Edwards, Sir Clive Woodward, Baroness Grey-Thompson – have written chapters and HRH The Princess Royal supplied the foreword. How did you secure their involvement?

I know Jonathan’s PE teacher, so that introduction was easy; Clive did some coaching at Uppingham School when I taught there, so that was easy too. I was determined to have an essay on sport for disabled pupils. I had met Tanni just once and I kept pressing (she is very busy with the Paralympics) until she said ‘yes’. So personal contacts over 40 years of teaching captured most of the contributors. HRH heard about the book from a mutual friend, I was told that she liked the concept, and so I wrote to Buckingham Palace. I was delighted when she said ‘yes’ and her foreword sets the tone of the whole book.

What are your hopes for the book?

The book started off as means for governors, heads and teachers to review their provision for PE and sport, but the range and quality of the essays meant that it should have a broader appeal. Groups who might want to know what goes on in independent schools in the UK include prospective parents, potential teachers, students and lecturers at universities, and foreign physical educationalists – the book is being reviewed in countries across the world. Many former pupils and teachers of these schools have already bought the book, and there is much to interest the general sports enthusiast.

What are the major developments and changes in the teaching of PE and provision of sport that you have seen in your career?

PE played a major role in state schools from the late 1930s but it was only from the late 1960s that independent schools began appointing PE specialists. Much was learnt from state schools. PE in independent schools has gone from strength to strength since then. Sport in independent schools has a longer history, and its strong position has been maintained despite all the many pressures on curriculum time, and even when many state schools have let sport go. The very best in PE and sport can now be found in many independent schools.

How do you see the teaching of PE and provision of sport developing or changing in the coming years?

The biggest challenge comes in the role of the non-specialist games teacher. PE and sport in girls’ schools has always been taught by PE specialists, but in boys’ and co-educational schools non-specialists who teach another subject have long contributed in their own sports. But as the pressure for better examination results increases, as the scope of the sporting programme broadens, as the expectation that all pupils should be in a team grows, as the best use of expensive teachers’ time comes under bursarial scrutiny – so the hiring of peripatetic sports coaches will surely grow. Many schools now have a director of sport working alongside the director of PE, and part of the former’s role involves the employment of visiting coaches.

To order a copy of Physical Education and Sport in Independent Schools, visit our bookshop by clicking here.

John Catt’s Guide to International Schools – out now July 6, 2012

Posted by Jonathan Barnes, editor in Independent Education, New releases.
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We’re pleased to announced the release of John Catt’s Guide to International Schools 2012/13.

This authoritative guide is fully updated and revised and more schools than ever before are profiled.

The directory includes information on more than 2,500 international schools worldwide.

It also features details of international curricula and examinations, educational organisations and associations and Ministries of Education worldwide.

The editorial section includes the following articles:

●Dr Ian Hill, deputy director general of International Baccalaureate, on the history and development of international schools;

●ISC Research on the growth in number of international schools worldwide;

●EF International Academy on diversity in the classroom;

●Jean Vahey, of the European Council of International Schools, on the importance of outreach programmes;

●Stephen Spahn, Chancellor of The Dwight School in New York City, on the ‘spark of genius’ within every pupil;

●Anne Keeling, of Fieldwork Education, on the International Middle Years Curriculum;

●Kevin Bartlett, director of the International School of Brussels, on ‘constructing learning, conserving choice’;

●The Association for the Education and Guardianship of International Students (AEGIS) on the importance on high-quality guardianship;

●Angela Wright, on Cambridge ESOL examinations, on the correct pitch of English language exams;

●Veronica Cancio De Grandy, of European University, on five rules for job success;

●Habitat for Humanity, on how volunteering inspires future leaders.

To order a copy of the book, visit our bookshop at www.johncattbookshop.com.

New release – Physical Education and Sport in Independent Schools July 3, 2012

Posted by Jonathan Barnes, editor in Independent Education, New releases.
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It is our great pleasure to announce the release of a new book examining the teaching and provision of physical education and sport in independent schools.

Editor Malcolm Tozer has assembled a stellar line-up of contributors to this 300-page book, which will make essential reading for headteachers, directors of sport and PE teachers.

The book traces the origins and history of physical education teaching in our schools, examines the current ‘state of play’ and takes on advice from leading sportspeople and educators on developments for the future.

Some of those to contribute include Olympic triple jump and world-record holder Jonathan Edwards, rugby World Cup-winning coach Sir Clive Woodward and 11-time Paralympic champion Baroness Grey-Thompson. The foreword is written by HRH The Princess Royal.

The book also includes a full record of independent school pupils who have represented their country between 2000-2012.

The full chapter list is as follows:

FOREWORD HRH The Princess Royal

PART ONE – INTRODUCTION

OVERVIEW Malcolm Tozer

IN THE BEGINNING Malcolm Tozer

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT TODAY John Goodbody

PART TWO – STATE OF PLAY

THE PRE-PREP Liz Taplin

THE PREP SCHOOL Kevin Doble

THE CO-EDUCATIONAL BOARDING SCHOOL Fi Drinkall & Bob Chappell

THE GIRLS’ DAY SCHOOL Victoria Sumner

THE SPECIALIST SPORTS SCHOOL Graeme Maw, Adrian Whatling & Craig Considine

A GOVERNOR’S VIEW Jonathan Fry

INSPECTION FINDINGS Paul Brewster

HINDSIGHT FROM THE HILL Roger Uttley

PART THREE – LASTING BENEFITS

OFF TO THE RIGHT START David Hanson 

INSPIRING AMBITION Jonathan Edwards

LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT James Whitaker

MOTIVATION AND TEAM-BUILDING Roger Black

LEARNING TO PROJECT AND PROMOTE Gordon Wood

SERVICE BEFORE SELF Ben Goss

CAREERS IN SPORT Clive Woodward

SPORT AND POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT Sue Campbell

CONTRIBUTING TO NATIONAL SPORTING SUCCESS John Goodbody

PART FOUR – TALKING POINTS

RISK, RESILIENCE AND CHILDHOOD FREEDOMS Tim Gill

THE ADVENTURE SPORTS ALTERNATIVE Malcolm Campbell

SPORT AND THE PRIMACY OF THE CLASSROOM Joesph Spence

THE TALENT MYTH AND THE POWER OF COACHING Neil Roskilly

EXAMINATIONS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION John Spoule, Malcolm Thorburn & John Bowers

TEACHER OR COACH; TEACHER AND COACH? Neil Rollings

MANAGEMENT OF SPORTING EXCELLENCE Robert Holroyd

FIT FOR LIFE? Gavin Sandercock

SPORT AND FEMININITY Jane Gandee

THE MAKING OF HETEROSEXUAL MEN Eric Anderson

SPORT FOR THE DISABLED Tanni Grey-Thompson

ARE PE AND SPORT FIT FOR PURPOSE? Anthony Seldon with Steve Shortland

PART FIVE – AFTERWORD

PLAYING FOR YOUR COUNTRY, 2000-2012 Malcolm Tozer

To order the book, please visit our bookshop by clicking here.